One of the recent trends in Second Temple and early Christian research has been the reexamination of ancient book culture and book production. Some have recently argued that the notion of a single author who produces a single completed book is dangerously anachronistic for making sense of some Jewish and early Christian literature. See, for example, Eva Mroczek, The Literary Imagination in Jewish Antiquity (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016) and Matthew D. C. Larsen, Gospels Before the Book (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018). Broadhead’s study of the composition and production of Matthew’s Gospel contributes to this discussion as he argues for moving away from a view of Matthew as a text produced by a single author and toward a view that emphasizes that text as an unfinished living tradition.

Broadhead argues against scholars who view Matthew as a literary unity and, instead, emphasizes that the “narrative world of the Gospel...

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