In The Storied Ethics of the Thanksgiving Psalms, Joshua T. James develops and applies a narrative ethical hermeneutic in his interpretation of the thanksgiving psalms. In the first of his five chapters, James introduces an ethical reading of the thanksgiving psalms. He sets forth his thesis, that the stories of distress and divine deliverance told in the thanksgiving psalms play an ethical role in the ancient Israelite worshiping community by contributing to the community’s “ethos,” or “narrative world that is constructed to frame ethical action” (p. 29). James rightly distinguishes his approach from that of other ethicists, who intimate that good liturgy creates good people. Instead, James maintains that good liturgy has the potential to form character (pp. 6–8).

In his second chapter, James further clarifies his narrative-ethical approach, which he refers to as a hermeneutical vantage point or shared outlook, rather than an established methodology. His approach is...

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