This volume’s 18 essays are organized according to 5 major themes: the image of God, evil, law and forgiveness, God, and ethics. No single overarching thesis is advanced. Rather, the essays are united by various recurring interpretive moves and by Schüle’s goal of demonstrating that the biblical text is a “discourse” between various voices that shape the biblical texts. In reading this “discourse,” the “truly challenging task is to appreciate the composite nature of biblical texts, such as the Primeval History, without limiting their meaning to their final form (‘Engestalt’) or reducing them to randomly connected literary fragments” (p. 1).

Rather than summarize each essay, I sketch some recurrent themes of the collection. Schüle detects allusions to the image of God in Gen 2–3 by comparing the passage to the Mesopotamian mīs pī rituals. But this conception differs from that of the Priestly source. The Priestly concept focuses “on the...

You do not currently have access to this content.