This impressive volume (DBAM) is situated within the broader field of media studies insofar as it is concerned with the effects of “communications media on human culture” (p. xvii). Of course, the editors have focused that broad concern on the Bible and related ancient literature. In an age where communicative media are so diverse and print dominated, DBAM seeks to provide a historically and culturally informed corrective to potentially unwitting assumptions by “researchers of all levels” regarding ancient media (p. xvii). For the purposes of this volume, the boundaries to that historical and cultural information encompass the Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian, Greek, and Roman Empires, with an “emphasis on terms, themes and theories that might be encountered while reading a media-critical study” (p. xvii).

Person and Keith provide a substantial introduction to media studies for biblical studies at the outset of the volume (pp. 1–15). This essay is very...

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