There are 15 praiseworthy blurbs in the opening pages of Wright’s book! Larry Hurtado’s foreword (pp. xvii–xix) also praises the book, specifically the research of chs. 5–6. He explains Wright’s use of “communal reading events” (CREs) as “one person reading from a manuscript while others listened” (p. xvii; I could not locate a definition from Wright himself, though he assumes a specific definition on p. 123 n. 15). An important implication of Wright’s book for Hurtado is how it partly undermines the prevailing assumption of a “low level of literacy” posited by historians, since only one literate person is needed for CREs to take place (p. xviii). Wright concludes that he has succeeded in overturning this assumption (p. 209).

In ch. 1 (pp. 2–10), Wright explains his impetus as follows: “The problem, as I see it, is that this entire subject of communal reading events and their role in controlling...

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