This revised doctoral thesis examines the literary meaning and function of references to sin and sinners in Luke’s initial presentation of Jesus’s public ministry (Luke 5:1–6:11). Szkredka engages in a preliminary examination of Luke 1–4 and notes that this section of Luke prepares the reader for the fact that God’s intervention to address human sin is underway in the coming of God’s messianic agent. This messianic agent has the divine authority to challenge how others perceive their sinfulness and to provide release from sin.

Szkredka examines five discrete pericopes that highlight sin and sinfulness. He notes that Jesus’s calling of Simon Peter models “the realization that sinfulness can be properly understood only on Jesus’s terms. Having asserted a distance between himself and Jesus on account of his own sinfulness, Simon ultimately submits to Jesus’s call, indirectly recognizing Jesus’s authority to cross and eliminate the alienation caused in Simon’s mind by...

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