ABSTRACT

Mark Twain was deeply interested in freedom of speech, and in particular, he was concerned about the utility of satire in furthering the benefits of free speech. A review of some of his commentary suggests that Twain's satire impedes the ability of free speech as a mode of exploration, while his humor—as a much more open-ended kind of expression—facilitates freedom of inquiry.

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