Maybe the first thing readers should know about Rhetoric, Politics & Culture (RPC) is that it claims no allegiance to rhetorical studies as such. While we are not so vain or reckless to presume that we should or can burn the whole thing down (although we have our days . . . ), our project is not to preserve traditions or save the field from itself.1 That kind of thinking is what got us here in the first place. RPC is a journal born of a discrete moment in rhetoric's intellectual history, but that moment itself betrays a sustained white supremacist project whose many egalitarian masquerades collide repeatedly with their own contradictions. This journal is indeed a response to the violent rot that the National Communication Association's Distinguished Scholar controversy revealed, but it more fundamentally strives to function as a coalescence of generations of fugitive planning taking...

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