Aderinto takes Nigeria's colonial history in a fresh direction, inspired by studies in animal history in Africa and elsewhere. The principal aim is to create more inclusive historical knowledge by seeing animals as agents of history, continuing the enrichment of a historical inquiry that followed the transformative incorporation of such concerns as gender, geography, or material culture. Ambitiously including multiple animal species, he promises “the first detailed account of the world animals made for Nigeria” (21) because “African history was not made by humans alone” (5). The first half of the book focuses on animals themselves as colonial subjects and as instruments of imperial culture and power. The second engages human–animal relations, concentrating on the culture and politics arising from the control, fear, and exploitation of animals. The book succeeds in its principal aim, most directly in the first half. The idea that colonial regulation and exploitation of animals remade...

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