Understanding the history of West African peoples in the aftermath of European colonial domination remains an enormous challenge, in particular when attempting to comprehend those events from the perspective of the colonized. Nonnative historians have engaged in efforts to “collect” those histories since at least the nineteenth century, in particular through the expeditions of such scholars as René Caillié, Heinrich Barth, Georges de Gironcourt, Maurice Delafosse, and Paul Marty. These acts of salvage, although generating value for succeeding generations through access to sources not otherwise available, led to the appropriation of authorial and scholarly rights by outside writers and the suppression of African intellectual achievements and contributions. This process of historical production, perhaps best explored theoretically by Michel-Rolph Trouillot,1 is the subject of Elara Bertho and Marie Rodet's edited presentation of Djiguiba Camara's Essai d'histoire locale. The editors succeed in restoring Camara's authorial power and authority while providing...

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