Black scholars work with multimodal and interdisciplinary texts and ideas. If we read across black studies, from slave narratives to the present, we can observe that black creatives and intellectuals and organizers thread together the arts, the hard sciences, history, sociology, music, math, ecology, architecture, dance, economics, and more. In bringing together multiple sets of ideas, these thinkers and artists challenge the hierarchical organizing of knowledge. In some instances—as in Sylvia Wynter's work, as well as her analyses of Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire—they pair the sciences and poetics. This pairing (what Sylvia Wynter calls bios-mythoi) asks that we think relationally about humanity and the figure of the human; this allows us to glean how the corporeal—the body—is not purely biological; the body, the very biologics of our flesh, is produced through story-and-with-physiology. Put otherwise, biology is narrated (we tell stories about what biology is, we tell and retell each...

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